Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk treats the miracle of the 1940 evacuation with a refreshing solemnity. Nolan chooses progression of time rather than exchange of words as his medium of communication, but even that time is warped as the plotlines transition between land, sea, and air, each frame lasting the space of a week, a day, and an hour, respectively. Minimal, deliberately stilted dialogue leaves us looking … Continue reading Dunkirk

WHAT’S THAT? TIME TO TALK ABOUT ETHICS IN DESIGN? : AN OVERVIEW OF A MISSING DESIGN DIALOGUE

By Joel Calvert CLICKBAIT: AN ENTRY POINT INTO THE ETHICS OF DESIGN “Increasingly, the way we use our skills is to compensate for the deficit between the audience’s desire for a sensitive, intelligent product or service, and the product itself. The end result is a total breakdown of trust between the audience and their visual environment. The intelligent observer has almost no choice but to … Continue reading WHAT’S THAT? TIME TO TALK ABOUT ETHICS IN DESIGN? : AN OVERVIEW OF A MISSING DESIGN DIALOGUE

No One Says No To Gaston: How Lefou Models Typical Human Behavior

By Noah Diekemper People have clashed in controversy since the news broke that Disney’s live-action update of Beauty and the Beast would use Gaston’s lackey LeFou to feature an “exclusively gay moment.” Some decried Disney’s gay parade (“think of the children!”), while others failed to see the change as newsworthy at all (“Wait, he wasn’t gay before?”). I think that the latter view is more … Continue reading No One Says No To Gaston: How Lefou Models Typical Human Behavior

Embracing the Awkward: Why We Fear Awkwardness and What To Do About It

By Leah Hickman “At least the awkward is over.” It was a nonchalant comment made by a 20-something-year-old dinner guest at my parents’ home last year, but my mom immediately picked up on it. “What’s with your generation and the obsession with ‘awkwardness’?” she asked. With three children now in their early twenties and a growing number of newlywed church friends, my parents have recently … Continue reading Embracing the Awkward: Why We Fear Awkwardness and What To Do About It

There is No “Might Have Been”: The Multiplicity of Goods and Learning to Affirm Reality

By Emily Lehman “There would be just one right thing, without alternatives: he must do that.” -William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury “I took the road less traveled by, / And that has made all the difference.” -Robert Frost, “The Road Less Traveled” “For of all sad words of tongue or pen, / The saddest are these: ‘It might have been!’” -John Greenleaf Whittier, … Continue reading There is No “Might Have Been”: The Multiplicity of Goods and Learning to Affirm Reality

Letter From the Editor, March 2017

By Chandler Ryd   An essay is a room. In writing, the author chooses words with which to furnish it before inviting you all, the readers, to enter. Nouns are the chairs and couches where you can rest; verbs are the tables—hard surfaces—that allow you to lean forward and work; metaphors are well-placed lamps and windows, illuminating and casting contrast.  The sum total, the atmosphere … Continue reading Letter From the Editor, March 2017